Select language
Search results
1 to 10 out of 44 images
  • Images
    1-10
Map of Kabul and surrounding country. The Second Afghan War 1878-80: Abridged Official Account (1908), f.p. 288
Place, date
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 056
Panorama of the south-eastern front of the Bala Hissar fortifications, seen from a hillock near the Ziyarat-e Shah Shahid (see RE 059), opposite the main gate. According to Afghan tradition [S.Q. Reshtia] this gate was called Peshawar Gate or Shah Shahid Gate; the Lahore Gate was situated at the eastern end of the Char Chatta Bazar of the city. In the background the fortifications run up to the Bala Borj (upper tower) and the wall, on the crest of the mountain Sher Darwaza. The white buildings on the right corner used to be the prison and residence of Prince Mhd Yaqub, son of Amir Sher Ali.
Place, date
Kabul, 1879
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 057
Close up view of the main gate Darwaza-ye Shah Shahid or Peshawar Gate, on the eastern wall of the Bala Hissar. Although it is not the Lahore Gate, which was the eastern gate of the city of Kabul, it was often called so by the British. The gate is composed of two octagonal flanking towers and a middle recess in three parts. The lower part seems to be of stone, the upper storey of plastered brick, ornated with Mughal style arches, partly crowned with battlements. The right tower was called Borj-e Bejanju after the Indian architect of the gate and of some buildings inside the Bala Hissar. The left tower was known as the Borj-e Khuni (Blood-tower), as condemned criminals were thrown from its top. In front of the gate and the adjacent walls is a ditch, crossed by a wide ramp.
Place, date
Kabul, November-December 1879
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 058
Front view of the entrance on the western side of the ziyarat of the Islamic saint Shah Shahid. Close to this spot Amir Shah Shuja ol-Mulk (1792-1803-1810-1839-1842), son of Amir Timur Shah was murdered on April 5, 1842 by the hand of Shuja od-Dawla, son of Nawab Zaman. In this graveyard the tombstone of John Hicks, who died in Kabul in 1666, was found by Masson in 1831 and reported again in 1839, but had vanished when it was searched for in 1879.
Place, date
Kabul, winter 1879/80
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 059
In the right foreground: fortifications of the lower south-eastern wall of the Bala Hissar, as seen from the east. In the left foreground: part of the moat. Behind it is a wall around a vegetable garden. In the background: fortifications, connecting Bala Hissar with the Borj-e Bala (upper tower) on the flanks of the mountain Sher Darwaza.
Place, date
Kabul, November-December 1879
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 060
Almost frontal view of the Darwaza-ye Nagara Khana, called the City Gate by the British, flanked by two towers. Continued to the left and right by walls, made from stone and burned brick, crowned with a Moghul style cranellation with loopholes. This gate was situated close to the northern end of the western wall of the lower Bala Hissar, leading to the Shor Bazar. The parapet on top of the right-hand tower was probably added in December 1879 by British engineers.
Place, date
Kabul, winter 1879/80
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 061
A general view over the old parts of the city of Kabul and the lower Bala Hissar before its destruction, in two parts. In the background the Mountain Koh-e Asmai. In the left foreground two circular structures, probably ice-houses (Yakhdan).
Place, date
Kabul, November-December 1879
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 062
Bird's-eye view from the upper Bala Hissar in direction NNE over the palace gardens. The layout is a typical Mughal chahar bagh, a garden divided into four parts, fed by water channels. In the left background the same palace as shown on RE 064; to the right the Tapa Maranjan, at that time also called Siah Sang.
Place, date
Kabul, winter 1879/80
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 063
One of the few remaining parts of the old Bala Hissar close to its northern wall. The building was first used to house the 4th Goorkhas Regiment, afterwards it became the Commissariat yard. The same palace can be identified on Photo-No. RE 063 in the upper left part.
Place, date
Kabul, winter 1879/80
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 064
Partial view of the southern front of the Bala Hissar with the buildings of the so-called British Residency in the centre. In front of the walls a wide moat frozen over.
Place, date
Kabul, November-December 1879
Collection
Royal Engineers Museum, Library and Archive 1878-1880
Series
RE 057-099, Kabul Photographs
RE 065